Photojournalists

Servicemen celebrate in Atlanta on V-E Day, 1945, AJCP336-016a.

The rise of photojournalism began in the 1920s with the invention of smaller 35mm cameras. While not all photographers used 35mm, some still opted for 4×5 cameras, the portability greatly impacted the need for more images in newspapers. The shift in photography from posed images taken with large bulky cameras quickly changed to more natural photographs documenting events as they happened. This approach was spurred by war photographers during World War II who could show readers at home first-hand what was happening on the battlefront. 

Often many rolls of film, hundreds of photographs are taken of an event, but only a few will be published or even seen. The image selected must convey to the reader the essence of the story, the feeling of the moment, and the significance of the event. However, the image must remain objective and paint an accurate picture of the narrative unfolding. 

As AJC columnist Celestine Sibley once noted in reference to photographer Floyd Jillson, “… There is a strong bond between reporters and photographers who have slogged together to floods and fires and murders, who have fought deadlines and weather, reluctant subjects and astigmatic bosses.”

Civil rights demonstrators protesting Davison’s retail store, 1961, AJCP338-044p.
Martin Luther King Jr. funeral procession through Atlanta, 1968, AJCNS1968-04-09c.
Anti-war demonstration in Atlanta, 1970, V003-700418-A12.
Atlanta Braves Hank Aaron moments before his 715th record breaking home run, 1974, AJCNL763-015e.
Presidential candidate John F. Kennedy campaigning in Georgia, 1960, AJCN119-006b(2).
Rev. Jesse Jackson, Coretta Scott King, John Lewis marching through Atlanta, 1987, AJCP230-01b.
Crew members extinguish a fire during a race at the Atlanta Motor Speedway, 1972, AJCN130-068e.
AFSCME sanitation strike, 1970, V003-700323-A23.
One of the stories they covered for the Georgian Newspaper, Tony Nour was the brother of Elias Nour (1914-1993), whose rescues of stranded climbers on Stone Mountain earned him the Carnegie Hero medal in 1953, LBP33-170a.
Elias Nour (1914-1993) was celebrated for rescuing stranded climbers on Stone Mountain, served as its safety director, and assisted in the carving of the Confederate memorial sculpture. He left Georgia in 1963. Envelope description: Nour, Elias, LBP33-173a.
Elias Nour (1914-1993) was celebrated for rescuing stranded climbers on Stone Mountain, served as its safety director, and assisted in the carving of the Confederate memorial sculpture. He left Georgia in 1963. Envelope description: Nour, Elias, LBP33-170b.
 Elias Nour climbs the steep side of Stone Mountain, 1958, AJCN074-003b.